A view from the rim of Seminole Canyon shows the steep limestone sides carved through eons of erosion. Pools of water and green shrubs dot the floor of the canyon.

Seminole Canyon State Park, Texas

A bronze sculpture standing outside the Seminole Canyon depicts a shaman as if it were one of the famous pictographs brought to life. The deer antlers growing out of the head, the staff with a circle, and the raven are all symbols related to ancient American shamanism.
Shaman Sculpture

Texas has some of the best state parks anywhere. One that we keep going back to is called “Seminole Canyon State Park and Historic Site”. What a mouthful!  It’s a hard name to say (especially if you’re a dog), but a wonderful place to stay.

There’s miles and miles of hiking trails. We go for a hike almost every day and hardly ever go the same way twice. My favorite trail follows along the rim of Seminole Canyon all the way to the Rio Grande River by the Mexican border. It’s a 7-mile round trip. Both Tom and I have sore paws by the time we finish that one! There’s also some shorter loops that don’t go all the way to the river.

A pictograph panel displays several humanoid figures including a winged man with deer antlers apparently growing out of his head. This is believed to depict a shaman entering the spirit world.
Fate Bell Pictographs

Seminole Canyon is famous for its Native American rock art. It’s so amazing, it’s protected. People can’t hike in the canyon without a ranger-guided tour. Dogs can’t go at all. But, Tom really enjoys looking at the art, so I guess I don’t mind (much).

The most wonderful thing about Seminole Canyon State Park is the peace. The campground is about a mile from the highway, and a long way from the city. At night, the stars shine like a giant Christmas Tree in the sky. The local coyotes make more noise than anybody. They sound like they’re having a party! They never get too close to the campground, though.

I’m glad that Texas takes care of places like this. If they didn’t protect it like they do, pretty soon it would be all used up and gone. Even though there’s a lot of rules, it’s good to know that everything will still be peaceful and whole next time we visit.

A view of Seminole Canyon from the Fate Bell Shelter. The roof of the shelter arches overhead. Scrub brush and small pools of water dot the canyon floor.
Seminole Canyon from Fate Bell Shelter

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